Light at the end of the tunnel

We are at a time in our country’s politics where youth empowerment is a topic that dominates political propaganda but when it comes to implementation, well, look no further than the President’s recent apppointment to head the Sports, Arts and Social Development fund: 91-year-old Moody Awori. NINETY-ONE-YEAR-OLD. The man is literally older than the sovereignity of our country!

The irony of the appointment is depressing to put it mildly. This appointment spits in the faces of Kenyan youth and quite frankly highlights the blatant disregard in which our sports and arts are held. The appointee himself has no credible record to which he can be backed by in either field and the President’s remarks concerning his appointment seem to raise more questions than answers.

How hard can it truly be for our President, considering all the resources at his disposal, to setup a competent team of professionals to carry out interviews for the said office and determine a suitable candidate who can lead our sports and arts in a NEW direction? Was it really that hard to find a single Kenyan with enough experience in the said fields to warrant the said appointment? Why did he go even further to suggest that our youth are not to be trusted with public funds l? Why is it that we always seem to take two steps back(or in this case ninety one) whenever we seem to be heading in the right direction?

This is really painful to take when we consider what the private sector has done to promote the arts and sports in what are tough economical conditions and the blatant neglect that has become part and parcel of our public service. The same people that our president has accussed of incompetence are the people who go out of their way to provide sufficient platforms for our youth to express themselves in the said fields and receive a stable supply of income.

Privately organised tournaments like Extreme Super 8 soccer tournament have provided such platforms. The competition consists of a three-tier annual grassroots soccer leagues that accomodates about 2,500 footballers under the age of 25 providing an ample environment for them to showcase their skills to potential suitors and scouts.

Green Sports Africa is another private entity that is working towards bridging the gap between talent and opportunity for our youth in soccer. Not only have they successfully held various soccer tournaments but they also have a good soccer academy that aims to nurture well-disciplined, competitive athletes.

Similar endeavours in other sports are desperately needed in the pursuit of growth of our sports and arts but unfortunately for us the government has proved to us once again that it cannot be relied upon for change. The importance of the role that we as the private sector has to play cannot be understated. By all means possible we should support endeavours like the above mentioned by turning out in support of such tournaments because they are all aimed at the betterment of OUR community and that is what should count the most. Only this way shall there be light at the end of the tunnel.